Michelle Williams

Michelle Williams and activist Tarana BurkePhoto: Getty Images

Amongst the glitz and grandeur at the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards tonight, prominent Hollywood stars are cutting through the frivolity of the awards ceremony to shed light on victims of sexual assault and racial or gender inequality—issues that were spotlighted within Hollywood this past year as several accusations of sexual misconduct came out against leading male figures in the business including Harvey Weinstein, Kevin Spacey, Brett Ratner, and Louis C.K..

Time’s Up, a Hollywood-born initiative to fight workplace harassment and abuse, will stage a red carpet social action this evening, with actors and actresses like Reese Witherspoon, Jessica Chastain, Rosario Dawson, and Mark Ruffalo all wearing black attire in a show of unity at the Globes tonight, but that’s not all: Actresses Meryl Streep, Emma Stone, Susan Sarandon, Michelle Williams, Laura Dern, Shailene Woodley, Amy Poehler, and Emma Watson will be accompanied to the awards ceremony by leading gender and racial justice advocates. Some of the leading names include Tarana Burke, the founder of the #MeToo movement; Ai-jen Poo, executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance; and Billie Jean King, founder of the Women’s Sports Foundation, Women’s Tennis Association, and the inspiration for Battle of the Sexes, starring Emma Stone, who will escort her to the event.

It’s yet another gesture that demonstrates both how serious Time’s Up is about sharing the spotlight with those who don’t typically cover fashion magazines and trot down red carpets, and how pointedly different this awards circuit will be. Considering the actors and actresses who came forward with their stories of sexual assault and harassment in 2017—Rose McGowan and Ashley Judd being some of the movement’s frontrunners, which landed them in Time’s Person of the Year issue—ceremonies such as the Globes or the Oscars are now being pushed by the very celebrities they fete to look beyond the on-stage in-jokes and shiny statues and instead, focus on the bigger issues at hand. It’s about time.

This article was originally published on Vogue.com